I Can’t Get Enough Of The Opening To ‘Graduation Day’ (1981)

With all of the turmoil going on in the country right now, there is one thing that can unite us all as one.  One thing that can take away all of the pain burning through our bodies.  One thing that can help us rise above the bullshit that we may endure for the next 4 years.  And that thing is……………………..The opening 5 minutes of the 1981 slasher movie Graduation Day!

Awwwww yeah!  Boogie down, baby!  If that doesn’t take the Trump stench off your clothes, nothing will.  And yes in case you were confused after watching that clip, Graduation Day is a horror movie and not an after school special about a track team who just wants to dance.  Oh – and I apologize if any of you had a seizure while watching some of the editing that was done in the video too.  Granted, I recently revisited Graduation Day and realized that it is an underrated gem as far as cheesy 80’s slasher movies go. And it even has a young Vanna White in it!  Not turning letters though unfortunately.

**BREAKING GRADUATION DAY NEWS**

Upon looking up the movie on Wikipedia, it states that Graduation Day has made over 23 million dollars.  And it cost $250,000 to make.  This has to be a typo or a joke, right? Whatever.  How about that opening theme song?!?!  Yeah!

Sunday Bloody Sunday: ‘The Final Battle’ From ‘Scanners’ (1981)

Remember when Michael Myers battled Busta Rhymes in the finale of Halloween: Resurrection?  I know, I know – we all want to forget, but we unfortunately need to accept and deal with it.  The point is that it sucked, but the finale in David Cronenberg’s fantastic 1981 flick, Scanners, between Michael Ironside and Stephen Lack was awesome!

Sometimes you just have to resort back to the classics, and on this week’s Sunday Bloody Sunday, I’m doing just that.  Yes, not much more needs to be said about the final battle between Vale (Lack) and Revok (Ironside) as they go head-to-head (get it?) in an impressive special effects-laden tour de force.  Bonus points are given for Lack’s exploding eye trick and for his fire hands.  Michael Ironside’s white eyes aren’t too shabby either.

Sunday Bloody Sunday: ‘Shish Kabob Death’ From ‘Happy Birthday To Me’ (1981)

If you like Scooby Doo endings, then I’m sure you loved 1981’s underrated slasher flick, Happy Birthday To Me.  And if you have a fondness for shish kabobs, then I’m sure you thought twice about letting your significant other feed you one after seeing that movie.

Welcome to Sunday Bloody Sunday where this week, you guessed it – we’re talking shish kabobs!  Delicious, mouth-watering, murderous shish kabobs.  I personally think that Ginny overreacted just a tad after Steve was trying to put the moves on her with a romantic fire burning in the background.  Are her shish kabob feeding skills really that bad or is she a vengeful murderer who was set to take Steve out from the get-go?  You be the judge as you watch the clip below:

God Bless Practical EFX: Eddie’s Werewolf Transformation From ‘The Howling’ (1981)

Quick!  What’s the best werewolf transformation from a horror movie ever? The common knee-jerk answer would be to say An American Werewolf In London.  But another werewolf movie came out in 1981 that in my opinion, topped David Naughton’s iconic lycanthrope metamorphosis.  I’m talking about Joe Dante’s, The Howling, and when Eddie Quist (Robert Picardo) gets his full werewolf on in front of Karen White (Dee Wallace Stone), it’s quite a feast for the practical effect eyes:

That clip was both awesome and depressing at the same time.  Awesome for obvious reasons of course, but depressing because of the fact that practical effects are becoming more and more extinct each day in horror movies.  It’s this scene in The Howling that helped me to talk about it in the same sentence as the classic An American Werewolf In London.  Rick Baker’s work in the latter was outstanding, but Rob Bottin one-upped him in Joe Dante’s film and gave us some special effects that will stand the test of time. Minus the cute Chewbacca looking werewolf version of Dee Wallace Stone in the movie’s final frames of course.

Howling Pom